Nosebleed Vermont Urgent Care

Have you ever had a nosebleed? You most likely have as they are quite common. In fact, over 60 million Americans get nosebleeds every year. So why do people get them? Essentially, blood vessels in the nose are highly sensitive, making them susceptible to bleeding, particularly in older adults.

Although nosebleeds are common, any kind of unexpected bleeding can be frightening. Nosebleeds typically occur during dry, cold weather.Dry air can cause the lining of the nose to crack and bleed, leading to a nosebleed. But they also can occur in hot, arid climates. Additionally causes of nosebleeds include trauma (including nose-picking), as well as colds, allergies, hypertension and blood thinners.

Can a nosebleed be an emergency? The answer to that depends on various factors, including the amount of blood flowing and whether the nosebleed responds to conventional treatment methods. It is important to know your own body. Do you heal fast? Do you have a problem with blood clotting? Do you get chronic nose bleeds? Obviously, a nose gushing blood is a more serious situation than a nose with a slight blood drip.

During a nosebleed, conventional wisdom sais to tilt your head back, however that is not a good idea as it will cause the blood to run down the back of your throat. Instead, it is recommended to tilt your head slightly forward and pinch your nostrils together for three to five minutes or until the bleeding has stopped. If, in the rare case that the bleeding hasn’t stopped after this time, continue squeezing for an additional 10 minutes. Ice packs can also be useful in slowing the flow of blood.

If the bleeding hasn’t stopped after 15 minutes, or if you have bled 6 ounces or more, you should visit the ER where a doctor can evaluate your situation.

If you are continuously experiencing nosebleeds, it’s important to consult your physician as frequent nosebleeds can sometimes be a sign of more serious underlying health conditions.